The Ishmael Guestbook Archives: 14-25 September 1997


One, if not the most thought provoking books I have read in the past decade. Simple, elegant concepts and teachings, for an all too complex world. Common sense wisdom at a time when we should stop and take a look at our communities and our world.
Scott Okin <smokin@interaccess.com>
Chicago, IL USA - Thursday, September 25, 1997 at 22:07:54 (PDT)
looking for other books as thought provoking as Ishamel, (this includes all sequels).

thanks
katie

kathleen Reynolds <kreynold@drew.edu>
Madison, NJ USA - Thursday, September 25, 1997 at 11:23:15 (PDT)
Esily on of the best books ever written and will in time change the way everyone thinks.
Kent Slater <mcampose@globalserve.ca.com>
Oakville, Ont Canada - Thursday, September 25, 1997 at 06:25:57 (PDT)
mr. quinn writes horribly, but that's ok. The characters are not consistent, but that's ok. The plot is nonexistent, but that's besides the point. The point of this book is that it is not a book, it is a message... It isn't too hard to figure out. I read Ishmael for my human nature & behavior senior seminar is SOUHEGAN HIGH SCHOOL... and we Talked about it. My teacher is into this book. she Believes. she wants us to. But are we really going to go heft ourselves up adn run out and save the world? are we too young? are we too stupid? Will anyone remember this in 50 years time? i hate being a skeptic. let's go buy the rainforest and save all the treefrogs and ocelots. If only.
One of the main points i thought of early on, in answer to several of Ishmael's questions that the silly narrator (Ok, Mr. Quinn) can't seem to figure out, would be,
MAN HAS EGO.
he wants to believe he is as good as the gods. he wants to believe his good . or evil. he puffs himself up, loves power, massacres little things for sport, plays around with lakes for fun, he has Ego.
Do treefrogs and ocelots?
Hm. guess i could post that as a question. Anyone int'rested in corresponding, please do... This hasn't CHANGED my life, but it has Affected me , someways.
well. we'll see.

allison l. poirot <ztigerr@juno.com>
amherst, nh USA - Tuesday, September 23, 1997 at 21:58:57 (PDT)
Very interesting. Makes me think real hard.
Daniel Houy <dhouy@trinity.edu>
San Antonio, TX USA - Tuesday, September 23, 1997 at 20:46:27 (PDT)
I just finished reading Ishmael. And as I type this message it is almost un-imaginable that 5,000 acres of rain forest and 4 species or plants have been destructed. I can help but feel sad that sitting here at this moment, I can not stop the process in its tracks, nor can any One person. This end of destruction must start somewhere and with several million someones!!! I hope that Ishmael is that start and several million someones get the message that time is of the essences. 2,000 more acres have just been destroyed.
Sonia Oros <Oros@flash.net>
San Antonio, Tx USA - Tuesday, September 23, 1997 at 19:01:47 (PDT)
Thanks, Ishmael!
Jill Shipe <jillshipe@aol.com>
San Diego, CA USA - Tuesday, September 23, 1997 at 10:33:30 (PDT)
I was required to read this book, Ishmael for a class called Science and Our Global History at college. My college is the only college in the USA to offer this course. I don't know how many kids read the book, not many though. I found that as soon as I started reading it, I couldn't put it down. All those kids who didn't read it truly missed out on one of the best experences of their young lives. It was excellent. I am now asking myself questions that I had never thought of before. I am recommending it to my friends and family. Keep up the good work D.Q.!!!!!!
Carla Miller <Carmil@.com>
Andover, OH USA - Monday, September 22, 1997 at 14:13:51 (PDT)
I loved this book!
Emily Weast <Prof Twig@aol.com>
Charlotte, NC USA - Monday, September 22, 1997 at 12:20:42 (PDT)
A great book. I am recommending it to all my friends.
I read it once, and I am reading it the second time so that I can explain it better to other people.
I also ordered all of DQ's other books.
I will try to spread the message in my country.

An Jetty <imu66@hotmail.com>
Beirut, Lebanon - Monday, September 22, 1997 at 12:01:27 (PDT)
Ishmeal and the story of be changed my whole out look on life and humanity.
Patrick Michalak <pjmichal@oakland.edu>
bloomfiels hills, MI USA - Monday, September 22, 1997 at 08:19:38 (PDT)
Some thoughts on the "struggle" between Life and Entropy: Jonathan writes below that "the real universal struggle is between Life and Entropy." Good point, though the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics does not just say that "everybody's gonna die." It says simply that order tends to decrease. Entropy, in shorthand, says that Life can't happen, because Life is a continually increasing of order. That is what makes Life special. Life is gorgeously subtle in its struggle with entropy. It USES entropy as its driving force. A mutation of DNA is entropy breaking down the order of the original DNA code of the parent. The trick is that the mutation sometimes works better than the parent, and ALA-PEANUT-BUTTER-SANWICHES . . . POOF!, we have a cool new species. We could define Life as the holy process by which entropy shoves itself up its own ass. In the case of the Takers, etropy appears to have missed its ass, and its actually working, so we're falling apart. I suppose our goal is to shove him back into his ass where we want him?
John Stonecypher <stonecypher@earthling.net>
Mason City, IA USA - Monday, September 22, 1997 at 06:06:13 (PDT)
Yeah I want to play in the "sand box". It's 3:00AM. I have been provoked out of valuable sleep by this unevenly styled yet exquisite book. Yes I have to play.

What is most striking about Ishmael's words are their resounding truth. Though it's difficult to say in any personally practical way why survival of the species, OOPS I mean survival of diversity is compelling; it never the less is. It might be the life force whispering to us: "survive...survive...survive". We are moved by this book because we know that what Quinn says about our survival is true. If we continue as we have we are doomed; all of us living creatures. From what I've read in this "sand box" most people that have left messages here (maybe Bruce B-Chan excepted) agree with this premise. I find it, however, slightly disturbing the moral character that some readers have put on Quinn's message. I'm not sure saying "Taker" = bad "Leaver"= good is not just some other mother culture whispering in our ears. You know maybe a "Grandmother culture". The danger that I see is that with the morality comes a sweeping myth-building sledge hammer that keeps the clarity of Quinn's book as it relates to this world at bay. There are a few points that beg to be explored:

- What does it mean to survive as either Taker or Leaver? What really is valuable about surviving one million years as opposed to 30,000 or 10,000? The late hour may be making me cynical....

- Entropy (another universal law) ensures that we all die eventually. (Takers, Leavers, Squatters...etc.) Rocks are the only real winners. I mean absolute undeniable winners. You know if you think about this you realize that the real universal struggle is between Life and Entropy.

- At the end of the book Quinn talks about the end of evolution among the takers. I wondered if he was using this to underlie the irony of the existence of a telepathic gorilla. I mean what an evolutionary twist!

- I also thought that if Ishmael really believes what he demonstrates to the narrator at the beginning of the book (the part where he leads him do question the myth that says humans are the ultimate product of evolution) he contradicts it and diminishes the power of its implications at the end of the book.

As I said it's late so I did not read every entry in this guest book (when you're tired somehow it's easier to "talk" than to listen) so maybe some people have already commented on the preceding. I actually loved this book I would like to "talk" with others about what they personally think can be done to slow entropy's leveling of all us living creatures.


Jonathan Elkins, Vancouver, British Columbia.

Jonathan Elkins <jelkins@direct.ca>
Vancouver, BC Canada - Monday, September 22, 1997 at 04:12:26 (PDT)
We loved both Ishmael and The Story of B. We continue to work on our own little piece of the Mother Earth.
Rose and Emela

Rose Chantal-Kobus <roseck@inreach.com>
Stockton, Ca USA - Sunday, September 21, 1997 at 21:59:46 (PDT)

NUMBER TWO!

I have just opened the door to the second excerpt from My Ishmael!

As I have alerted you already...on successive Mondays (OK, it's not Monday...again, I couldn't wait!), the Ishmael/Bnetwork websites are sharing seven never-before seen writings of Daniel Quinn -- excerpts from the November 1 release date novel by DQ publi shed by Bantam Books called, My Ishmael.

Last week, I turned this one loose: "Hello
There."
I have just (9:30pm CDT) opened the door to "Your Culture". Over the next 5 weeks you will see, "Tunes & Dancers" on 29 September, "The Parable Examined" on 6 October, "Wealth Take r Style" on 13 October, "Less Is Not Always More" on 20 October, and "My God, It Isn't ME!" on 27 October.

Not to worry...this is only a fraction of the book! So, what are you waiting for?! Go read it!

Alan <webmaster@ishmael.org>
Houston, TX USA - Sunday, September 21, 1997 at 19:32:16 (PDT)
Having been "freed from religion" as a child, I was one who questioned everything that others were taught to accept without thought to if it was sane or not. I never understood the need to have a home with space or rooms larger than one used, or own m ore than 1 of anything. I stopped consuming other living souls when they became factories of slaughter. To me this was the natural way of life. To those I met I was "weird" and when was I "moving in and getting furniture anyway?" I found a haven that ha s become a hell due to expansionism (others are calling it progress). I ask why do you think you need all these stores to buy worthless junk that creates more expansionism? Our problem is that one has to seek a place of quiet to get in touch with one's soul. This is something that too many fear and have thus created this over-populated world where we no longer have time or the place to sit and listen to the wind. Alice Walker also writes a similiar tale in "The Temple of My Familiar" and she also spea ks Quinn's truths to us. We must spread the message so that all species may live in harmony.
Shelly O'Keefe <Shelly O'Keefe@ctaz.com>
Bullhead City, AZ USA - Sunday, September 21, 1997 at 00:25:57 (PDT)
Having been "freed from religion" as a child, I was one who questioned everything that others were taught to accept without thought to if it was sane or not. I never understood the need to have a home with space or rooms larger than one used, or own m ore than 1 of anything. I stopped consuming other living souls when they became factories of slaughter. To me this was the natural way of life. To those I met I was "weird" and when was I "moving in and getting furniture anyway?" I found a haven that ha s become a hell due to expansionism (others are calling it progress). I ask why do you think you need all these stores to buy worthless junk that creates more expansionism? Our problem is that one has to seek a place of quiet to get in touch with one's soul. This is something that too many fear and have thus created this over-populated world where we no longer have time or the place to sit and listen to the wind. Alice Walker also writes a similiar tale in "The Temple of My Familiar" and she also spea ks Quinn's truths to us. We must spread the message so that all species may live in harmony.
Shelly O'Keefe <Shelly O'Keefe@ctaz.com>
Bullhead City, AZ USA - Sunday, September 21, 1997 at 00:25:14 (PDT)
I just have to say that Mr. Quinn's book changed my life to the extent that I became an agnostic from being a religious person. Like others, I don't have the solution, I wouldn't be here if I did, but hey, I'm doing the best I can: recommending the bo ok to everyone I meet. I hope to do more than just this, but it seems like with my current capabilities, that is the best. And thank you, Mr. Quinn, for giving me another eye.
Jae H. Park <jpark@fas.harvard.edu>
Cambridge, MA USA - Saturday, September 20, 1997 at 21:35:03 (PDT)
Hello Bruce!! Once again I must AGREE with you.. Yes, all those ways you listed do sound like they wouldn't work. No sireee.. There is no way we will go back to Hunter-gather, and the other ways you quoted just don't seem to plausible.. The only thing in that quote I am close to agreeing wioth is the population figures he mentios. But I tend to think the planet can support a bit more than 10 million, or whatever he wrote..
Yup, we have to figure out a way to live than jas never been seen before. The vision may have been lived before, but the methods of living will be somewhat new to us.. This is my belief.. See ya next time Bruce B-Chan!
And I must ask again.. Did ya really read the book??...

Kurt Finguerra <kfingu01@sprynet.com>
Bend, OR USA - Saturday, September 20, 1997 at 16:19:47 (PDT)
Is there anybody in my "taker-nation" Switzerland who read Ishmael and The story of B. ? Usually I have no access to the internet. Therefore please write to:

Stefan Jaeggi
Vorderbergrain 3
4104 Oberwil
Switzerland

Thanx

Stefan Jaeggi
Basel, Switzerland - Saturday, September 20, 1997 at 13:06:05 (PDT)
Nope. I'm through wasting time on you monkey-nuzzlers. Believe in stupid crap if you want to--it matters not to me.

Oh yeah: here's a quote from a late scientist and your fellow liberal that neatly demolishes the basic premises of ISHMAEL and the whole dopey "Takers vs. Leavers" idea in one nice little package. If you won't believe ME when I tell you your ideas are loo ny, maybe you'll believe the late author, who was known during his life as "The greatest science teacher in history."

"All our self-inflicted environmental problems, all our weapons of mass destruction are products of science and technology. So, you might say, let's just back off from science and technology. Let's admit that these tools are simply too hot to handle. LET' S CREATE A SIMPLER SOCIETY, in which no matter how careless or short-sighted we are, WE'RE INCAPABLE OF ALTERING THE ENVIRONMENT on a global or even on a regional scale. LET'S THROTTLE BACK TO A MINIMAL, AGRICULTURALLY INTENSIVE TECHNOLOGY, with stringent controls on new knowledge. AN AUTHORITARIAN THEOCRACY is a tried-and-true way to enforce the controls.

"SUCH A WORLD CULTURE IS UNSTABLE, though, in the long run if not the short--because of the speed of technological advance. Human propensities for SELF-BETTERMENT, ENVY, and COMPETITION will always be throbbing subsurface; opportunities for short-term, lo cal advantage will sooner or later be seized. UNLESS THERE ARE SEVERE CONSTRAINTS ON THOUGHT AND ACTION, in a flash we'll be back to where we are today. SO CONTROLLED A SOCIETY must grant great powers to the elite that does the controlling, inviting flagr ant abuse and eventual rebellion. It's very hard--once we've seen the RICHES, CONVENIENCES, and LIFE-SAVING MEDICINES that technology offers--to squelch human inventiveness and acquisitiveness...

"Or you might imagine throttling back even further, back to a HUNTER-GATHERER SOCIETY, where we live off natural products of the land and abandon even agriculture. Javelin, digging-stick, bow, arrow, and fire would then be technology enough. BUT THE EARTH COULD SUPPORT AT THE VERY MOST A FEW TENS OF MILLIONS OF HUNTER-GATHERERS. How could we get down to such low population levels...? Besides, we hardly know how to live the hunter-gatherer life anymore: we've forgotten their cultures, their skills, their t ool-kits. We've killed off almost all of them, and we've destroyed much of the environment that sustained them...

"The alternatives seem worse than cruel: they are ineffective."

--CARL SAGAN,
_Pale Blue Dot_
New York; Random House, 1994, First Edition, pages 382-383

For a fun read, link to
http://home.pacbell.net/bchan/feature.html

And remember,
Ape Must Not Kill Ape!


Bruce "B-chan" Lewis <bchan@pacbell.net>
L.A., CA USA - Friday, September 19, 1997 at 23:07:16 (PDT)
This is by far the most thougt provoking book I've read in my life. The amazing part is that what's expressed here is something that I and we have know all our lives.
I've always maintained that "My Higher Power is much better at letting go and lettting me than I am at letting go and letting Him (for lack of a better term)." I am very glad to have recieved this book as a gift from my sister.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who needs faith or hope restored.

Any feedback or comments are welcome.

Alive with hope,
Scott

Scott Lucente <SELPSL@AOL.COM>
WEST ALLIS, WI USA - Friday, September 19, 1997 at 21:35:12 (PDT)
Just found this website, yes! Have just finished Ishmael, just started the Story of B and have just picked up Providence from the library tonight. Will comment later.
Cheryl Jewhurst <cjkj@intergate.bc.ca>
Vancouver, BC Canada - Friday, September 19, 1997 at 17:47:46 (PDT)
Upon reading Ishmael as required for an anthropology course: this book left me hopeful where it left much of the rest of my class depressed. don't get me wrong, i missed ishmael. but he had to die. it is that event which makes his (our) quest so pro found. after finishing the book, my professor asked us if it had effected anyone's life to the degree where they would live differently. i don't see how it couldn't. at least, i don't see how one could emerge from the intellectual depths of this book with out THINKING differently. and the way we think leads to the way we live. it may seem an impossible task to fix the plummeting flying machine we are all strapped into, as perhaps not every student, or person for that matter, will escape into the backwoods to homeschool their children and start a different society. but every great oak starts with a tiny acorn. sorry for the lame cliche, but here's a few more. rome wasn't built in a day. quinn has sown the seeds, and change might be just around the corner . my first reaction upon completing the novel was pessimistic in nature. it seems like our society has advanced so far in the wrong direction, that there is no way to change it. but if we all felt that way, then truly nothing would change. so i decide d to see it as i described earlier; there is hope for the future. and i'm going to do what is in my power to do. i'm going to pass around ishmael to share him with everyone i know. who's to say that's all it will take to eventually change the world?
mara smith <mjsmith@willamette.edu>
salem, or USA - Friday, September 19, 1997 at 15:14:48 (PDT)
John Stonecypher I accept your comments.
If anybody is looking for a GREAT book to read try "The Lucifer Priniciple", by Howard Bloom. This book is essential if anyone is interested in being "B" or taking the next step after Daniel Quinn's most profound works. Mr. Bloom takes us on a sc ientific expedition into the forces of history through the eyes of the psychologist and biologist written for the layman. This book is advisable if one is serious about making a change. I was mesmerized by the mirror Bloom holds to the human condition.
Marv Blackman
Diamond Springs, Ca. USA - Friday, September 19, 1997 at 15:13:02 (PDT)
Bruce…Don't go away, buddy. Every discussion group needs some flamebait. It helps prevent arm strain from patting each other on the back. Besides, I'll miss your intriguing writing style. You're a great help to us here, whether you know it.

He raises a good point, boys and girls; one that Ishmael only raises peripherally--- "What to do?"
What indeed? Does it require the type of sacrifice that Bruce implies. Can we use aspects of Taker technology to effect change? Which aspects? What kind of change? How about the benefits of using toxic elements of our technology? Ever consider trying to r ecycle all the components of the computer your using? As an engineer, I'm not even sure we could manufacture these things affordably without some damage to the environment we purport to be trying to save. Could we get this message out without them, or boo ks (how many trees?) or meetings (how do you get to them?) You see, the solutions are a lot more complicated than you may infer.

We're busy discussing programs and missing the point that change will not be made by "old minds with new programs," but by, "new minds with no programs." You're right, Marv, we are doomed, you and I. Our old minds cannot conceive of the steps necessary to save the world. But our children still can. The best we can do is inculcate them with the attitudes and philosophy of Ishmael. Oh, and spread the word. We must be B.

Patty, "pondering, analyzing, and trying to formulate some plan of action," is not controlling Taker behavior. It is a uniquely human activity which allowed our ancestors to live those 3 million years in the garden.

"We are stardust. We are golden. We are billion year old carbon.
And we've got to get ourselves back to the garden."----Woodstock--- Crosby, Stills and Nash

Robert G. Dery <RGDery@mail.telis.org>
San Diego, CA USA - Friday, September 19, 1997 at 05:37:40 (PDT)
I love playing in the sandbox!!

I just have to say that I was introduced to "Ishamael" a little over a year ago. Time is now divided between before and after "Ishmael." When I finished the book, I felt like my brain had exploded and the pieces were put back together in a different ord er. Since then, my theories of life, philosophy, evolution etc have been honed. Clarity of thought is something I thought I knew until I read this book. I bought "The Story of B" without even reading the jacket cover.
I have introduced almost everyone I know to these books. But I only give them to those who I know will benefit from it. Only once was I disappointed. Someone just didn't get it. Many have disliked it, but no one comes away thinking the same way. Dani el Quinn is a genius!! He is not a preacher or even a leader - he is a simple guy who squeagies the gunk out of our eyes so that we can see (very poetic, I know, but a compliment nonetheless).

Jessica Hoar <jhoar@student.umass.edu>
Amherst, MA USA - Thursday, September 18, 1997 at 17:58:00 (PDT)
Hey Marv, quick response to your thoughtful comment below:

"Taker" and "Leaver" has nothing to do with "good" and "bad." If survival can be assumed as a universal goal, the Taker way is simply a way that does not help us achieve that goal. It does not work, just like eating poison mushrooms is a way that does n ot work. Is the eater of poisonous 'shrooms "bad"? No. Studid, maybe, or at least ignorant of mushroom species, but not bad. I hope I make the distinction a little clearer for you?

John Stonecypher <stonecypher@earthling.net>
Mason City, IA USA - Thursday, September 18, 1997 at 10:32:51 (PDT)
To Mary Blackman, from one of the "doomed"; "Argue for your (our) limitations, and they will be yours( ours)."
Jim Demko <Seawind@alaska.net>
Petersburg, AK USA - Wednesday, September 17, 1997 at 20:38:39 (PDT)
my first time on. I'll save comments for later. Thanks!
Sherie Westervelt <westervs@oit.edu>
Klamath Falls, or USA - Wednesday, September 17, 1997 at 18:09:56 (PDT)
I picked up the Story of B thinking it was a new mystery — my local library had shelved it in that section. I was so taken by Daniel Quinn's thinking that I subsequently bought Ishmael & look forward to My Ishmael. (I also feel some rapport with Mr. Quinn, having myself been born in Omaha in 1935.)

A column in the latest Forbes Magazine commented on the recently discovered evidence of cannabilism among one of the ancient tribes in New Mexico. The columnist used this to argue that the concept of an idyllic society before the agricultural revolution was unsupportable — that these people were hardly innocent primitives but rather bloodthirsty cannibals. I think I know how Ishmael would respond to that but was curious if this had come to Mr. Quinn's attention and if he had any thoughts on it.

Warren Peterson <wpeterson@greysf.com>
Kentfield, CA USA - Wednesday, September 17, 1997 at 13:36:17 (PDT)
Ive read all three of Mr. Quinn's books and thought them to be motivating and inspirational. Mr.Quinn has pointed out the underlying theme in a Taker society is power, the more power the better. As much as I hate to say it we are doomed because the po wer structure is not going to listen to a bunch of whining Leavers. Mr Quinn proports to be an atheist but he disguises his mono-theistic tendency quite well. The words Taker and Leaver are categorical terms for good and bad .The word Leaver now is a m agical word that acts like a meme that travels through the community like prayer with hope to do its work. There is an expresson going around. The one with the most toys before death wins. I am sympathetic to Mr. Quinn's passions, but unfortunately as I see it man is doomed.
Marv Blackman <frethnkr@inforum.net>
Diamond Springs, CA USA - Wednesday, September 17, 1997 at 11:35:23 (PDT)
Both books that we read made us think and to continue
to think. We are teaching our children there is hope.

rae & jane caswell <wajsclan@globalserve.net>
north york, ont canada - Wednesday, September 17, 1997 at 09:03:08 (PDT)
I haven't been able to stop pondering, analyzing, and trying to formulate some plan of action since I finished Ishmael. Problem is, aren't I then using controlling behavior (taker behavior) to address the issues. I suppose, however, that to try and s olve taker problems requires taker behavior. I will never think quite the same again.
Patty Price <ruger6@concentric.net>
Oak Creek, WI USA - Tuesday, September 16, 1997 at 18:37:06 (PDT)
The book was recommended to me some two years ago, but for some reason I never bought it because I wasn't told anything about it. I took it along on vacation with me earlier this month, and from the moment I started reading it I simply couldn't put it down. What a compelling book Mr. Quinn! It certainly is food for thought for any logical human being living in a taker culture. What flowed through my mind as I neared the end of it was, "what role if any can I play in educating others about the serio usness of the problem?" Hopefully everyone else wth a sense of responsibliity to the planet who reads the book asks themselves a similar question. We are all in this mess together, so let's get together to do somethings about it! Bless you Mr. Quinn fo r writing such a valuable piece of literature.
Jeff Maziarek <JMaziarek@aol.com>
Elmhurst, IL USA - Tuesday, September 16, 1997 at 08:10:50 (PDT)
I have just read Ishmael and I am a new person. It was given to me when I went to a 4 week course at the Biosphere 2 Center in Arizona. I am a environemntal engineering major an Purdue and was told in Arizona that I should read it. SO I did. Now I feel like I might be able to take all the knowledge I am learning here and actually make a difference. What an amazing book. I can't wait to read the others!
Megan Chikota <mchikota@ecn.purdue.edu>
USA - Tuesday, September 16, 1997 at 08:10:36 (PDT)

EARLY OPENING!

I have just opened the door to the first excerpt from My Ishmael!

As I have alterted you already...on successive Mondays starting TODAY (OK, it's not Monday...I couldn't wait!), the Ishmael/Bnetwork websites will be sharing seven never-before seen writings of Daniel Quinn -- excerpts from the Noverbmer 1 release date no vel by DQ published by Bantam Books called, My Ishmael.

Here are the excerpts (subject to change) and the order they will be added to the website:
  1. "Hello There", -- made public 5:15pm (CDT) 14 September 1997 -- NOW!
  2. "Your Culture" -- about 1200 words to be made public after 6pm (CDT) 22
    September 1997
  3. "Tunes & Dancers" -- about 2500 words to be made public after 6pm (CDT) 29
    September 1997
  4. "The Parable Examined" -- about 1400 words to be made public after 6pm (CDT)
    6 October 1997
  5. "Wealth Taker Style" -- about 2800 words to be made public after 6pm (CDT) 13
    October 1997
  6. "Less Is Not Always More" -- about 2400 words to be made public after 6pm
    (CDT) 20 October 1997
  7. "My God, It Isn't ME!" -- about 2400 words to be made public after 6pm (CST) 27
    October 1997
Some of the titles may look familiar from the website, but these excerpts (indeed, the entire book My Ishmael) are filled with totally new issues, and entirely new approaches to old problems.

Keep coming back to the Bnetwork and Ishmael websites! There's always something going on here!

Alan (The Webmaster)

Webmaster <webmaster@ishmael.org>
Houston, TX USA - Sunday, September 14, 1997 at 21:31:41 (PDT)
I am a microbiology major at the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. I also hold chemistry and philosophy minors. I have read Ishmael three times, Providence and The Story of B. Knowing what I know about biology, there are many ways to save th e Earth; Quinn's is simply the most logical.
Bruce B-chan Lewis, you are an idiot like your mentor (I am almost positive) Rush Limbaugh. If you really wich to know Edward Teller's true motives read Teller's War, No More War! and Better a Shield than a Sword As far as Jonas Salk, his vaccine infect ed many people as well as preventing polio, Albert Sabin is perhaps who should have mentioned. We are not animals? Yes we are. If you can argue against this you should receive the Nobel prize in biology for refuting evolution.
I do agree with you in one respect, talking changes nothing but ideas and ideas must be acted upon before becoming a physical reality. Lewis, your form of intellectual masturbation is common, typical and paramount ignorant.

For those of you who do believe there is something wrong with Taker culture, send some e-mail to discuss. I have been looking for those like you. For those of you who read Ishmael and did not understand it (like Mr. Lewis) send e-mail also. I enjoy th e battling of wits with unarmed people.
DeepGravity

John-Adam Bonk <dgravity@coredcs.com>
Stevens Point, WI USA - Sunday, September 14, 1997 at 00:01:52 (PDT)