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    User-set disclosure level: 1
    Network Record Number: 8870
    This record (8870) last updated: May 26, 2003
    First Name: Eva
    Last Name: Ghitelman
    Email: hysterical_woman@yahoo.com
    Organization:
    City: Rockville
    State: MD
    Country: UNITED STATES
    ZipCode: 20851
    URL: http://
    Why are you here?



    I read "Ishmael" on the advice of an English teacher at my school, and went to the library to find more Quinn books. I read "The Story of B" and it helped change my mind. I was worried that Quinn's ideas had never caught on, or had somehow been "disproved", so I looked up "Ishmael" on the Internet and found this site. I want to be a part of the movement.

    Any other personal information/resources/advice/ideas to share?

    A story

    Once upon a time, perhaps yesterday, a missionary went to visit a man in the Amazon. The man was a simple Indian, who lived the way his ancestors did for thousands of years. So the missionary came up to the man and said, "Follow the way of my God, and you won't have to live this way!" The man looked around and said, "What way?" "Like a savage! Look, your house is a simple hut, all you have to eat are a few nuts and berries, and you are clad in a dirty loincloth!" "So?" "Poor man, you don't know better. I'll take you to the big city." So the missionary took the Indian to the big city. He brought the Indian an ice cream cone, which the Indian had never had. "This is good," said the Indian, "So, if I follow your god I get ice cream cones whenever I want?" "No, my simple savage," laughed the missionary, "First you need money." He showed the Indian some dollar bills. "I make pieces of paper and I get ice cream?" the Indian said. "No, that's counterfeiting. You must work to get money." So the missionary got the Indian a job. The Indian worked hard and got his money. At the end of the day he got his money. "I must go home to my hut," the Indian said. "But you have enough money to buy a house better then your hut," said the missionary. He took the Indian to a real estate agent, and they bought a house, better then his hut. "This is a nice house," thought the savage, "better then my hut." So the Indian worked everyday to pay for the house. After a while he got tired. He went to the missionary and complained. "When I was in the Amazon I had to work only a few hours to get some nuts and berries, and meat every once in a while. Now everyday I must work many hours," he said. "But isn't the food better? Isn't there more variety?" asked the missionary. "It is not worth it," replied the Indian. So the missionary took the Indian to the store, and they bought him a television. The Indian now had something to make forget work. Unfortunately, now he had to work harder to pay for the television. The Indian complained to the missionary. "When I was in the Amazon I had to work only a few hours to get some nuts and berries, and meat every once in a while, and I could always make a little toy to entertain myself. Now everyday I must work many hours," he said. "But isn't the television a better toy?" asked the missionary. "It is not worth it," replied the Indian. So the missionary took the Indian to a car dealership and they bought a car. Now the Indian didn't have to walk to work, so he was less tired. Unfortunately, he had to get a job farther away to pay for the car. He worked many hours and spent much of his time in the car. The Indian complained to the missionary. "When I was in the Amazon I had to work only a few hours to get some nuts and berries, and meat every once in a while, and I could always make a little toy to entertain myself, and anywhere I wanted to go to was in walking distance. Now everyday I must work many hours," he said. "But can't you go to better places?" asked the missionary. "It is not worth it," replied the Indian. So the missionary took the Indian out to ballgames, clubs, and restaurants. Every weekend he could go out and see people. Unfortunately, the Indian had to work even harder and longer to pay for all these trips. Also, he saw many people were unhappy. The Indian said to the missionary, "Today I heard a woman jumped out of a tall building because she wanted to die. Nobody wants to die where I come from." "That's because your people are too simple to want something like that," replied the missionary. "So killing yourself is like good food and television and cars," said the Indian. He continued, "When I was in the Amazon I had to work only a few hours to get some nuts and berries, and meat every once in a while, and I could always make a little toy to entertain myself, and anywhere I wanted to go to was in walking distance, and even when people were unhappy they never killed themselves. Now everyday I must work many hours, so that I want to have death."

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