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  The Ishmael Community: Questions and Answers

Questions and More Questions...

    Your request found 170 questions.
    The newest (or most recently updated) are displayed at the top. Just click on the question to see the answer.

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  • The Question (ID Number 737): "The Man Who Grew Young" and Fritz Lieber's "The Man Who Never Grew Young" are remarkably similar. On the first reading of Quinn's graphic novel I thought that I was reading a fleshed out version of Lieber's narrative. Are the two estates aware of the existence of the other story?


  • The Question (ID Number 736): Was there a difference for you in the writing process when you wrote Dreamer versus writing something like The Holy or After Dachau? There are books like your Dreamer and all the many, many Stephen King and Peter Straub mass market paperbacks that you find on the shelves and then there are books like After Dachau and The Holy--books that it seems like the author put more of himself into, that were more personal to the author. Is there a difference in the writing process when you're imagining up things for a novel like Dreamer and your more recent fiction, which seems like a different kind of thing altogether?


  • The Question (ID Number 722): Were you influenced by any of the works of CS Lewis? Particularly I'm referencing "The Great Sin" excerpted from his "Mere Christianity." In this, Lewis goes in depth on how in the Bible it is pride which is Man's greatest sin. He sites how in the Bible Satan tempted man to find seek a independence and from this "human history; money, poverty, ambition, war, prostitution, slavery" etcetra resulted. He even uses an analogy similar to your pilot analogy (the man in free fall) where he sites a machine that "seems to start up alright and runs a few yards" only to fail because it is not being run on the proper fuel. The similarities are there, even if you weren't at all influenced, I wanted to thank you for perhaps opening my eyes to some truth.


  • The Question (ID Number 720): Regarding all the recent campaigns for the 'make poverty history' appeal and so on... Feeding an increased population? something we all know the connotations of...so naturally it begs the question. Is this good or bad for the whole situation? With aid, would the African population rise even more and take us back to where we started? I would donate, but I'm too ill-informed.


  • The Question (ID Number 716): I've read "Ishmael" and "The Story of B". Your thinking seems sound and well though out. You have proved through logical reasoning that God as Christians know him does not exist. On the other hand, C.S. Lewis proved in much the same fashion in "Mere Christianity" that God does very much exist. Have you read his book? Any response?


  • The Question (ID Number 715): I loved The Story of B, especially what it had to say about animism. In doing further reading on the topic, however, I've found that your definition of animism differs greatly from that found in dictionaries and encyclopedias or taught in schools. Why is this? Is their definition "wrong," or is it just focusing on different aspects?


  • The Question (ID Number 713): I have recently decided to give up dairy for health and animal welfare reasons. I cannot find any reference to dairy in daniel's books. I recently read an opinion that the drinking of cows milk is little more than a cultural tradition. I was wondering when people in human history started consuming dairy products and their reasons for doing so. I found an article from July 21, 2002 in The Sunday Times Magazine, uk "Cover feature: Is there a time bomb in your diet? Exploding the myths about milk" including the paragraph: 'Just 7,000 years ago, the first settled communities, with their new-found genius for growing crops and domesticating animals, were able to create a relative heaven on Earth, verily a 'land of milk and honey'. This phrasing reminded me of something familiar and wondered how it fitted in with 'the great forgetting'. I also gathered from this article that 7/10 people worldwide are lactose intolerant because dairy culture was largely confined to the Caucasian minority, and today most of humanity still thinks it a very peculiar practice to consume milk beyond the end of weaning, and even more peculiar to drink the milk of another species. So is cow milk drinking a product of taker culture? or am I rejecting a part of my leaver culture ancestry by giving up all dairy milk. I suppose what I am really asking about is whether it is true to say that people only started to drink dairy with the development or invention of the kind of agriculture that made people takers or was animal milk part of human life before then.


  • The Question (ID Number 711): Its obvious from the book and your answers to questions that you have knowledge on a broad range of subjects. Furthermore, to develop the unique perspective presented in ISHMAEL requires a special blend of disciplines (e.g., theology, anthropology, ecology, history, etc.). How did you acquire this knowledge and how did you develop the arguments used in the book?


  • The Question (ID Number 710): Was there a difference for you in the writing process when you wrote Dreamer versus writing something like The Holy or After Dachau? There are books like your Dreamer and all the many, many Stephen King and Peter Straub mass market paperbacks that you find on the shelves and then there are books like After Dachau and The Holy--books that it seems like the author put more of himself into, that were more personal to the author. Is there a difference in the writing process when you're imagining up things for a novel like Dreamer and your more recent fiction, which seems like a different kind of thing altogether?


  • The Question (ID Number 708): While reading After Dachau I began to wonder how the novel related to the stories of Ishmael as I'd heard it was a distant cousin of the trilogy. Eventually I gave up and just enjoyed the story. But, about a day after I finished, I realized that After Dachau was a long form, detailed example of how easily the Great Forgetting talked about in the trilogy could have come to be. Was this one of the intentions of the story, or am I reading too much into it. Alternatively, am I just dense in believing my discovery to be a revelation as opposed to an obvious conclusion.


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