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  The Ishmael Community: Questions and Answers

Questions and More Questions...

    Your request found 170 questions.
    The newest (or most recently updated) are displayed at the top. Just click on the question to see the answer.

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  • The Question (ID Number 515): I have a suggestion for an addition to the website... How about a general discussion threaded message board to stimulate more productive conversation instead of just the guestbook?


  • The Question (ID Number 512): A central and repeatedly stated assertion of the two Quinn books I read is that at some time humans lived in a stable equilibrium. That is not a worldview, that is an assertion of fact. A particular fact that is problematic in proving, yet Quinn claims to know it is true. He actually waters it down at one point and says that human population did grow steadily before some arbitrary level of agricultural innovation, but that it was slower than in recent times. My question is: Why should I believe that modern humans ever existed in a stable equilibrium? I believe that the growth rate has not been constant, yet how could I know that the early history of humans is fundamentally different from exponential growth in which growth is relatively slow for a long time early on?


  • The Question (ID Number 506): I want to use some of Dan's writings on my website/posters/flyers. Is it okay to use parts of the books? Who do I get permission from? The publisher? Dan?



  • The Question (ID Number 505): I feel like I've been lulled back to sleep, and I'm absolutely terrified. Maybe it was meeting so much apathy in so many people; as the school year ended, I found I no longer had the ability to be B. I have never suffered such a loss of identity, and I simply do not know what to do. Mother Culture has convinced me that there's no point--that nothing can be done. She screams it at me so loudly that I can't even get through a chapter of your books anymore--and when I try to make myself believe again, terror and shame overwhelm me and I go back to sleep.


  • The Question (ID Number 499): I very much appreciate your trilogy: Ishmael, The Story of B and My Ishmael. Your insights help us see how our Taker Culture represents an aberration in human evolution. I am interested in seeing a list of references that you cited for the factual material presented in these books. Would it be possible to e-mail such a list?


  • The Question (ID Number 490): Being at one time a staunch Catholic I was constantly worried that I would deviate from what the Magisterium taught. I referred to the Catechism for EVERYTHING. It's hard to break that habit and I find myself referring to the GORILLA constantly. Do you have any advice on how to "think outside the box" and not just regurgitate but actually "B"?


  • The Question (ID Number 489): Do you believe that one day, and I quote from Genesis "We will surely die," having eaten from the tree of good and evil, and if so, is there really any point in promoting your paradigm in the world?


  • The Question (ID Number 486): I'd like your permission to translate one of your works into the language of my home country.


  • The Question (ID Number 485): According to Ishmael, symbolically speaking, eating from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil led man to believe that he could make choices for himself that took him out of the hands of the gods, which ultimately has led him (and the rest of the world) to the edge of his undoing. The thought occurred to me that perhaps Jesus understood this, and that baptism was his attempt to cleanse mankind from this knowledge. Perhaps this is how he intended to be the savior of man; by washing away the (original) sin of Adam and Eve and placing man back into the hands of the gods. Tragically, this is not the interpretation of Jesus's intentions as taught by modern Christianity.


  • The Question (ID Number 482): The story of the Fall never made sense to me fully until I read the explanation in your book Ishmael. I'm curious as to how the serpent that tempts Eve fits into this explanation. I'm confused on this point since a serpent seems to be part of the Leaver community. So, what does the serpent really represent?


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